Category: Progressive Rock

Riverside – Love, Fear and the Time Machine

For Riverside’s sixth full-length album, Love, Fear and the Time Machine, vocalist, bass player, and principal songwriter Mariusz Duda attempted to impose upon himself a sense of midlife crisis in order to better craft the “story” he had in mind for this album. As such, Love, Fear and the Time Machine begins with a character that is initially lost, gradually reminiscing over love and fear in both the past and the future, who eventually finds himself by the end. (more…)

Gentle Knife – Gentle Knife

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To be honest, when Norway’s Gentle Knife asked me to listen to their self-titled debut, I was expecting a generic progressive rock album making a redundant homage to classic 70s progressive rock. Harking back to one’s influences musically is not uncommon and it is often especially evident on a band’s early works, yet this can sometimes be something that hinders a bands potential. However, despite the clear resemblance to 70s progressive rock, Gentle Knife’s debut album comes off as refreshing—portending great potential for their future. (more…)

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Anekdoten – Until All the Ghosts Are Gone

The hidden gem of cult progressive rock has finally climbed out from under their Swedish rock with their first release since 2007. Yes, Anekdoten has returned with their sixth full-length titled Until All the Ghosts Are Gone. Eight years has not dulled their abilities one bit, if anything their skills are even more refined. As such, Until All the Ghosts Are Gone is surely among the year’s top progressive rock releases.

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Code – Mut

Time and time again I have listened to this album, Mut, from UK based band Code, and I still can’t believe what I am hearing. Code has been around for a long time, Mut being their fourth full length album, and the second album with vocalist Wacian. Rather than following their roots that contained many elements of black and avant-garde metal, Code has instead switched it up with Mut and are now playing an eerie, strangely mysterious progressive post-rock hybrid of music that I find uninteresting for the most part. (more…)

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Steven Wilson – Hand. Cannot. Erase.

It does not seem that long ago that The Raven That Refused to Sing (Among Other Stories) made a resounding impact in progressive rock back in 2013. Two years later and Steven Wilson has returned with another release titled Hand. Cannot. Erase. This album leaves the “retro” progressive rock sound of its predecessor and explores generally more modern sounds. Fans of Wilson’s other band Porcupine Tree—currently on hiatus—should find much to enjoy here. Strands of the Porcupine Tree sound are sprinkled throughout Hand. Cannot. Erase., even to the point where some riffs or segments sound a little familiar. (more…)

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Lunatic Soul – Walking on a Flashlight Beam

Riverside’s Mariusz Duda has once again released another ethereal album with his solo project of Lunatic Soul. Walking on a Flashlight Beam is supposed to be the prequels to Lunatic Soul I and Lunatic Soul II. Duda continues to explore the twilight realm between life and death with this release. (more…)

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Utopianisti – Utopianisti II

While browsing on Bandcamp.com, I saw a hand drawn album cover with animals playing instruments. Put an animal on the cover and there is a good chance I will check it out. Thus was my first foray into the music of Finland’s Utopianisti, a jazz rock ensemble led by Markus Pajakkala. Pajakkala plays a variety of instruments and fleshes out the rest of his work with a large cast of guest musicians. (more…)

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PoiL – Brossaklitt

At no moment while listening to PoiL’s Brossaklitt album did I have any idea what the hell was going on. From the opening track to the end, Brossaklitt’s random chaos and quirkiness was relentless. PoiL is an avant-garde band from France that I recently discovered while exploring on Bandcamp.com. (more…)

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Steven Wilson – The Raven That Refused to Sing (And Other Stories)

In contemporary progressive rock, the name of Steven Wilson is a notable figure. His work in Porcupine Tree, Blackfield, No-Man, and now his solo albums, have brought him great renown. His most recent solo release—The Raven That Refused to Sing (and Other Stories)—was my favorite release of 2013, and perhaps my favorite album that Steven Wilson has been involved in. (more…)

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Yossi Sassi – Desert Butterflies

Desert Butterflies is the second solo album from former Orphaned Land guitarist Yossi Sassi. He expands on the oriental rock/metal sound of Orphaned Land and ventures into all new directions. Desert Butterflies is a fine collection of mostly instrumental progressive rock songs in the style of a Joe Satriani, perhaps, with strong Middle Eastern undertones. (more…)

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